Upcoming performances will be listed here as they are scheduled. Most of Anne’s creative energy lately, though, has gone into helping to create a new museum exhibit (see below).

Performances:

Sunday, July 14, 2019 - 20TH ANNUAL POWWOW AT MT. KEARSARGE INDIAN MUSEUM

Anne will give two performances of traditional Northeast Woodlands Native American stories at the annual Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum Powwow. Storytelling time: 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. For more information about the powwow, check out the MKIM website: MKIM 20th ANNUAL POWWOW

Museum Work:

PEOPLE OF THE DAWNLAND


in Jones House Discovery Center

Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth, NH

SO VERY HAPPY TO ANNOUNCE the opening of a new Abenaki exhibit, "People of the Dawnland", at Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth, NH!!

Suddenly this spring - in an exciting development - our plans for an Abenaki exhibit got fast tracked! "People of the Dawnland" is opening, May 1, 2019 and open through October 31, 2019, daily from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. (Visit strawberybanke.org for museum ticket info).

As part of your visit to Strawbery Banke Museum, plan to stop by to take in this exhibit at Jones Discovery Center. I will be in the exhibit space at least three days a week (Th/Fr/Sa). While there, it will be my honor to share stories of Abenaki history and culture with museum visitors while demonstrating how to make various forms of Abenaki handcrafted art. The People of the Dawnland are the Abenaki/Wabanaki peoples of Northern New England, southern Quebec, and the Canadian Maritime Provinces. The Abenaki are the People of the First Light, the East, the Place Where the Sun Rises, the Dawnland.

It has long been a goal of the museum to expand its intepretation of the Abenaki people. As a result of some happy coincidences a few years ago, I’ve been working with the staff at Strawbery Banke Museum for more than 2 years - planning ways to include more information about New Hampshire’s Indigenous people into the museum’s interpretive plan. The Abenaki people, their culture, history, and continuing presence in New Hampshire, Vermont, Maine, and Canada are an integral part of our history. More information soon!

People_of_the_Dawnland_logo_on_burgundy_background.jpg

PEOPLE OF THE DAWNLAND
In Jones House Discovery Center

Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth, NH

According to Tribal oral tradition, Abenaki people have lived in the place now called New Hampshire for more than 12,000 years -- since before Tribal memory. The Abenaki are part of a larger group of indigenous people who called themselves Wabanaki or “People of the Dawn,” and form one of many communities connected by a common Algonquian language family. From present day Newfoundland to the mid-Atlantic, these peoples also shared traditions, beliefs, and resources, and were connected by trade networks and family relationships.

Just as people enjoy vacationing on the Seacoast today, Abenaki people came to this area seasonally to set up camps for hunting, fishing, and food preparation.  

This space is dedicated to learning more about the People of the Dawnland, past and present, by exploring their culture, arts, foodways and storytelling traditions.

Objects found by archaeologists in the Puddle Dock neighborhood of Strawbery Banke include pottery and stone tools; and demonstrate that Native people have been here for millenia.

“We’re Still Here”

Today, according to the latest US Census, there are over 7,000 Native Americans and Alaska Natives living in New Hampshire. These are Abenaki people, as well as people from other tribes across the United States who have made NH their home. Other Abenaki people live across the U.S. and Canada.  Native people are members of our schools, our neighborhoods, and our communities.

Although Abenaki people today live modern lifestyles and live in modern homes, many also honor traditions, which may include making special meals or practicing traditional arts.

Traditional Abenaki Arts

For thousands of years the Abenaki have made intricately handcrafted goods to meet their everyday needs, working with materials supplied by the natural world around them.  Abenaki homes, clothing, weapons, canoes, baskets, pottery, cradleboards, etc. were practical yet beautifully made because Abenaki aesthetic traditions ask that an object made for daily use should be visually appealing as well as functional.  

Today there is a revitalization of Abenaki culture underway throughout N’Dakinna (Abenaki territory, literally “Our Land”) – and a whole new generation of people of Abenaki descent are expressing a renewed interest in preserving their heritage by learning and practicing the traditional crafts of their ancestors.

Land Acknowledgement

At Strawbery Banke in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, we are on the homelands of the Abenaki people, who have ongoing cultural and spiritual connections to this area. We acknowledge the land and the people who have stewarded it through the generations.

With our thanks to Liz Greene Charlesbois, Abenaki, who creates intricate patterns in birch bark, using her teeth. Bitten birch bark is an ancient Abenaki art form and we are grateful to Liz for allowing us to use one of her birch bark creations as part of the logo for this exhibit.

With our thanks to Liz Greene Charlesbois, Abenaki, who creates intricate patterns in birch bark, using her teeth. Bitten birch bark is an ancient Abenaki art form and we are grateful to Liz for allowing us to use one of her birch bark creations as part of the logo for this exhibit.

Jones House - An Education Center at Strawbery Banke Museum

Jones House - An Education Center at Strawbery Banke Museum